Funeral Advice.

Help with Arranging a Funeral..


Arranging a funeral for someone you love is usually a very distressing and challenging task. This can be made worse if you haven't had previous experience of the process, as it can be difficult to know what to do.Though your funeral director will be able to organise and coordinate the actual funeral service, there are various things that you or your family will need to do yourselves. These can vary depending on where the death occurred, and whether or not it was expected. Click on the following links to view advice on what avenues to follow:.

 

In the case of an expected death from natural causes

Note: In all instances, the doctor who cared for the deceased is responsible for issuing the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death and the Statutory Cremation Forms. The process varies depending on whether the person died in:


  • The doctor must issue a Medical Certificate of Cause of Death
  • If the deceased is to be cremated, ask the hospital to complete the doctor's cremation forms (if deceased is to be buried, no forms are needed from the hospital)
  • The hospital will issue a release form, allowing your funeral director to transfer the body to their funeral home or chapel of rest

How and where to register the death:

Once the doctor has issued the Medical Certificate of Death, you must make an appointment with your local Registrar to register the death. This must be done within 5 days. The Registrar will issue you with a green certificate for burial or cremation, which you will need to give to your funeral director.

What you need to register the death:

  • Evidence of the deceased's full name, age, address, occupation, marital status, date, and place of birth
  • If possible, birth and marriage certificates, the NHS card, and their National Insurance Number

The Registrar will also issue the Certificate of Registration or Notification of Death (BD8) to inform the Department of Work & Pensions.

  • The nursing home may require the body to be moved quickly, therefore it is wise to engage a funeral director in advance
  • The nursing home manager will arrange for the deceased's GP, or the hospice doctor, to issue a Medical Certificate of Cause of Death (you collect this from the home or doctor's surgery)
  • Your funeral director will collect the body and take it to their funeral home or chapel of rest.
  • If the deceased is to be cremated, your funeral director will arrange for the doctor to complete the statutory cremation forms

How and where to register the death:

Once the doctor has issued the Medical Certificate of Death, you must make an appointment with your local Registrar to register the death. This must be done within 5 days. The Registrar will issue you with a green certificate for burial or cremation, which you will need to give to your funeral director.

What you need to register the death:

  • Evidence of the deceased's full name, age, address, occupation, marital status, date, and place of birth
  • If possible, birth and marriage certificates, the NHS card, and their National Insurance Number
  • The deceased's doctor will visit you at home and issue the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death
  • If applicable, the GP will complete the necessary cremation forms (if the deceased is to be buried, no forms are required)
  • Your funeral director will collect the body and take it to their funeral home or chapel of rest

The Registrar will also issue the Certificate of Registration or Notification of Death (BD8) to inform the Department of Work & Pensions.

How and where to register the death:

Once the doctor has issued the Medical Certificate of Death, you must make an appointment with your local Registrar to register the death. This must be done within 5 days. The Registrar will issue you with a green certificate for burial or cremation, which you will need to give to your funeral director.

What you need to register the death:

  • Evidence of the deceased's full name, age, address, occupation, marital status, date, and place of birth
  • If possible, birth and marriage certificates, the NHS card, and their National Insurance Number
 

In the case of an unexpected or unnatural death

Note: If a death is unexpected, unexplained, or unnatural, the deceased's GP will not be able to issue the Medical Certifcate of Cause of Death. Instead, the GP, or an attendant police officer, must refer the case to a Coroner. It is the Coroner's role to establish the cause of death. You will be notified if the Coroner's investigations require a post-mortem.

  • The nursing home may require the body to be moved quickly, therefore it is wise to engage a funeral director in advance
  • The nursing home manager will arrange for the deceased's GP, or the hospice doctor, to issue a Medical Certificate of Cause of Death (you collect this from the home or doctor's surgery)
  • Your funeral director will collect the body and take it to their funeral home or chapel of rest
  • If the deceased is to be cremated, your funeral director will arrange for the doctor to complete the statutory cremation forms
  • If the death is not due to natural causes, it will be subject to a Coroner's inquest to establish to time, place, and cause
  • The Coroner will usually release the body for the funeral, even if the inquest is not adjourned
  • The death cannot be registered until the inquest is complete, although the Coroner will issue an interim certificate to allow you to close bank and building society accounts, etc
  • Your funeral director will collect the forms needed for the funeral from the Coroner
  • After the inquest, the Coroner sends the necessary forms to the Registrar, meaning you do not need to register the death yourself.

If the death occurred overseas, the case will be investigated and registered according the laws applicable in that country. The relevant British Consul may be assist in Registering the death, and though they cannot provide financial assistance, they will also be able to help you arrange a funeral abroad, or help you repatriate the deceased back to the UK. For financial assistance, contact the deceased's insurer.

Upon repatriation, contact your chosen funeral director who will then notify the the district Coroner of the death. Depending on the circumstances of the death, a Coroner's inquest may be neccessary. If no further investigation is required, the Coroner will instruct the Registrar to issue a Certificate of No Liability. This gives permission to bury the deceased. If the deceased is to be cremated, the Coroner will issue a Cremation Form 6.

If the deceased is to repatriated from the UK to a foreign country, their death must first be registered in the UK. Your funeral director will obtain permission from HM Coroner to repatriate the body, and deal with the embassy and consular officials in the destination country.

After preparing the deceased for repatriation, your funeral director will organise transportation of the body to the airport.

 
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